Eyeq Blog

Do you see colour slightly different to everyone else? 17 Nov, 2015

spot_blueDid you know that 8% of males, and 0.5% of females have some form of Colour Vision Deficiency (CVD)? This tends to run in families, and often occurs if child’s maternal grandfather is also colour deficient. However being CVD doesn’t mean the person can’t see any colours, it simply means they see slightly different colours to the “normal” colour.

 

For example, what most may see as a Bright Red, a CVD person may see as a Reddish-Brown.

 

There are three main types of colour vision defects, however the severity of each one can vary from minimal effect to a complete loss of sensitivity to that colour.

  • Protan – A decreased sensitivity to Red Colours
  • Duetan – A decreased sensitivity to Green Colours
  • Tritan – A decreased sensitivity to Blue colours (this is the least common)

 

CVD people can do most jobs, however they do have to be careful when going for jobs such as police, pilots or positions in the armed forces. They also need to be extra careful if they are electricians, paint specialists, or chefs.

Children with CVD

Genetic CVD is with you for the rest of your life. Children who have genetic CVD learn to adapt very quickly and often never experience any difficulties. However it can be useful to know if your child is CVD, as their learning style may need to be altered so that colour is not a differentiating feature in their learning activities.
 

Treatment Options

There is a new range of tinted lenses that can be worn for people who have a CVD, these can help the users see colours that were previously undetectable. If you think that you or your child might have CVD it’s important to talk to your optometrists and get assessed. The optometrists can also help determine the best lens options.

 

Book an appointment online – click here.

 



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